Home » RCGV Members Examine Incarcerated Women’s Experience of Violence Perpetration and Victimization

RCGV Members Examine Incarcerated Women’s Experience of Violence Perpetration and Victimization

RCGV members Echo Rivera, Sheryl Kubiak and Deb Bybee have examined the multiple experiences of incarcerated women’s violence perpetration and victimization:

Rivera, E. A., Kubiak, S. P., Bybee, D. (2014). Patterns of women’s aggression against partners and others: Broadening our understanding of violence. American Journal of Community Psychology, 54(3-4), 358–369.

Research on women’s aggression typically focuses on relational aggression. However, the study of violence must include multiple forms of violence such as aggression against partners and non-partner others, while also considering victimization experiences by partners and non-partners. The focus of this study is the multiple experiences of violence (perpetration and victimization) of women who are incarcerated. Incarcerated women are likely to experience higher rates of both than women in community settings, but most will be released in a brief period of time. Using a random sample (N = 580) we conducted cluster analyses to identify five patterns of women’s aggression. Clusters varied depending on the target/s of aggression (i.e., partner and/or others), and type of aggression (i.e., physical and/or intimidation). Multinomial logistic regression was performed to determine the relationship between women’s membership in a perpetration cluster and their victimization. Victimization history was related to an increased risk of perpetrating aggression, and varied depending on the target and type of aggression. Our findings provide support that research and interventions addressing women’s use of aggression must also address their victimization history. Furthermore, results indicate that for some women, aggression towards partners and others is related. Future research should investigate multiple forms of aggression.